• Media Bias: Find the Missing Words in the New York Times Report on NY Terror

    Here is the New York Times front page on the web, November 1, noon

    See if you can find the missing words

    That’s right: they completely omit ISIS, Jihad, “Islamic Extremism.” 

    They simply use the word “terror,” as they do with the shootings in Las Vegas.

    They omit the political/religious motivation.

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  • Quick Update on NY Terror Attack and Media Bias in Reporting It

    ◆ Deadly ISIS attack on innocents near 9/11: European-style vehicle attacks on soft targets come to America

    • Was a deliberate terror attack, according to FBI. Links to ISIS, Islamic extremism
    • Planned this attack in lower Manhattan for weeks and, according to sources
    • Followed ISIS instructions on conducting a truck attack “to a t”
    • The perp,  Sayfullo Saipov, is out of surgery and expected to survive. Said he was “proud of attack,” according to one authority.
    • Left behind a handwritten note in Arabic which says, “The Islamic State will endure forever” (ABC7 New York, link here)
    • Perp had apparently been on the authorities’ radar for some time
    • He came into the US on a “diversity” visa, a law sponsored by Sen. Chuck Schumer (D-NY) to ensure more immigrants from Africa, South Asia, the Middle East, and Latin America

    ◆ Media bias: Here is the New York Times front page on the web, November 1, noon

    See if you can find the missing words

    That’s right: they completely omit ISIS, Jihad, “Islamic Extremism.” 

    They simply use the word “terror,” as they do with the shootings in Las Vegas.

    They omit the political/religious motivation.

    ◆ Chuck Schumer says “don’t politicize” this incident

    ◆ Trump issues a flurry of tweets

     

     

    ◆ More as we learn more

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    Hat Tip to

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  • ZipDialog Roundup for Friday, October 20

    Articles chosen with care. Your comments welcomed.
    Linked articles in bold purple

    ◆ Tax Cuts, Tax Reform gaining momentum

    The Senate passed a Budget Resolution, the essential prelude to any effort to pass tax reform. Without the resolution, the tax bill could be stopped unless it had 60 votes. With the resolution, it needs 50 votes.

    Analysis: Whether it can get 50 votes depends on the details, which will affect different states, income groups, and economic sectors differently.

    Ending the deduction for state and local taxes, for example, hurts high-income people in high-tax states. That could cost Republican House votes if they represent such districts. (Most analysis misses the point that the state taxes hit high earners more so Republicans from middle-class districts might not be affected.)

    Giving everyone a large standard deduction sounds great . . . except to the residential real-estate industry, which thinks it will render mortage deductions meaningless for many middle-income buyers.

    Plus, we don’t yet know the breakpoints between tax brackets, so the impact on middle-income families cannot be forecast accurately.

    Politically, the Republicans must pass tax cuts. Whether they must pass larger reforms is less obvious. But even “must pass” legislation is a problem for this bunch.

     Unmasking investigation

    Obama’s UN Ambassador Samantha Power made more unmasking requests than McDonald’s makes hamburgers. Now, Power has told the House Intel Committee that she did not make those unmasking requests. Somebody else did, using her name. (Fox News)

    Since the testimony was behind closed doors, it is unclear if she knew or assented to the requests, if she knows who made the requests, or if “masking” an unmasking request is itself illegal. It is certainly unethical.

    Now, the same committee has called Obama’s last Attorney General, Loretta Lynch, to find out what she knows about these unmaskings and the Russia-Trump investigation. (Fox News)

    Comment #1: This massive unmasking for what seems like political purposes by the Obama Administration is not only a scandal in its own right. It will have real effects on national security if it blocks the renewal of FISA court authority, which must be done soon.

    Comment #2: It has also been reported that the FBI and DOJ knew about Russian bribery to obtain uranium ownership during the Obama years, when Hillary Clinton was Sec. of State. Bill Clinton was paid substantial funds personally for speaking to Russian entities at this time and the family foundation received vast sums (over $100 million) from investors with stakes in the transaction.

    This investigation was not revealed to the heads of Congressional Intelligence Committee, as is required.

    Moreover, this Russian scandal directly involves the FBI when it was head by . . . . Robert Mueller, now in charge of investigating Russian scandals.

    This stinks.

    US-backed forces declare “victory” over ISIS in Raqqa after 4-month battle (CBS)

    Comment: Now that ISIS is circling the drain, the real question is what comes afterwards in Sunni regions of Iraq and Syria.

    Iran and its proxies, Syria and Iraq, are determined to keep the Shiites in charge.

    That will fuel more radical Sunni insurgencies like ISIS and Al Qaeda.

    Catalonia’s bid for independence: Spain’s central government is now preparing to strip the region of its local powers (Los Angeles Times)

    The region’s president, Carles Puigdemont, did not renounce independence despite a Thursday deadline imposed by the central government.

    The escalating confrontation between Madrid and Spain’s most prosperous region sent ripples of unease across the continent, where European Union leaders are already wary of fissures within the bloc.

    Spain’s worst political crisis in nearly four decades of democracy could hamper a still fragile economic recovery in the country as a whole and cause particular financial harm to Catalonia, which is already experiencing a flurry of corporate flight. –Los Angeles Times

     Comment on Presidents and Fallen Soldier in separate ZipDialog post (here)

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  • ZipDialog Roundup for Tuesday, September 19

    Articles chosen with care. Your comments welcomed.
    Linked articles in bold purple

    ◆ Trump’s campaign manager wiretapped. That’s a big deal.

    The story was broken by CNN: Exclusive: US government wiretapped former Trump campaign chairman, starting in 2014 and continuing, off an on, until this year. The tap, authorized under the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA), would include periods when he was known to speak with Donald Trump. (Manafort also owned an apartment in Trump Tower; that might be relevant because Trump spoke of wiretaps in Trump Tower.)

    There is increasingly strong public speculation that Manafort will be indicted by Robert Mueller’s office.

    At this point, we do not know who the FISA warrant(s) targeted.

    Comment: At this point, we simply don’t know enough about this surveillance. (In fact, the information released to CNN was almost certainly a felony violation of secret proceedings.)

    • Anti-Trump people think the fact that a federal judge would authorize surveillance on such a senior figure in the Trump campaign suggests something very bad was afoot and that collaboration with the Russians may have been Manafort’s aim (if not necessarily that of others in the campaign).
    • Pro-Trump people think this information vindicates his repeated claims that he was wiretapped.
    • And, of course, a lot of people, myself included, want to know more before they reach a conclusion.

    I think a lot of people will agree with Dan Drezner (a centrist and no friend of Trump’s):

    Trump at the UN: Very tough talk. Threatens to “totally destroy” North Korea, calls Kim “rocket man,” and labels Iran a “rogue nation” (New York Times)

    He included terms he had seldom used recently: “radical Islamic terrorism.”

    The full speech is available here on YouTube.

    Comment: Trump’s speech was an unusually blunt, full-throated defense of America’s interests, as opposed to globalism, and included particularly sharp and detailed attacks on Iran, North Korea, and Venezuela.

    Critical responses to the speech line up as expected.

    More censorship calls on campus, this time because a professor wrote a scholarly article called “The Case for Colonialism” 

    The article, by Prof. Bruce Gilley of Portland State, was published in a peer-reviewed journal that is very anti-colonial, which presumably thought the piece was serious, well-researched, and would spark scholarly debate. The basic argument does not deny the evils of colonialism but says they must be balanced against the benefits and that anti-colonialism has itself carried high costs.

    Recently, Gilley publicly resigned from the American Political Science Association for its ideological bias.

    Here’s the report at Legal Insurrection.

    Comment: Given the political climate on today’s campuses, especially those on the coasts, what Gilley’s article sparked was not discussion but calls for him to be fired, censured, and tarred-and-feathered.

    Will the End of Syria’s civil war spell disaster in Europe as battle-hardened terrorist fighters return? (BESA Center)

    Mordechai Kedar says “yes” and adds that Iran has now effectively taken over Syria, strengthened Bashar al-Assad’s regime, and given a free hand to Lebanon’s Hezbollah.

    Comment: Iran’s expansion across the region was facilitated by the Obama administration and will cause death and destruction for years to come.

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  • ZipDialog Roundup for Monday, August 21

    Articles chosen with care. Your comments welcomed.
    Linked articles in bold purple

    ◆ Trump to announce new strategy, troop levels for Afghanistan tonight

    Comments:

    • The absence of leaks well before the announcement is a good sign of the internal discipline of the National Security team
    • Make no mistake: we are losing everything we fought for in Afghanistan;
    • Even the capital city is now a war zone; this dramatic deterioration happened on Obama’s watch, even though he had campaigned on the (false) promise that this was the war that really mattered; it is yet another example of his disastrous foreign policy strategy and tactics.
      • George W. did not succeed there, either, but things have gotten much, much worse in recent years.
    • There are really no good options here for Trump, but there are some much worse ones; the key is to remember the main US goal: simply to prevent staging areas for attacks on the US like 9/11; there is zero chance of turning Afghanistan into something good on the ground, only something less bad

    Barbie doll and meat-grinder bombs were weapons in foiled ISIS plot to blow up Australian airliner (Fox News)

    Why did they fail?

    An elementary mistake: the luggage they were packed in was 15 pounds over the airline’s weigh limit.

    Meant as real journalism; actually, self-parody: Solar eclipse reveals racism (The Atlantic)

    The classic joke about the New York Times is the apocryphal, apocalyptic headline: “World to End. Poor Affected Most.”

    The Atlantic does them one better and actually writes a story like that.

    On August 21, 2017, a total solar eclipse will arrive mid-morning on the coast of Oregon. The moon’s shadow will be about 70 miles wide, and it will race across the country faster than the speed of sound, exiting the eastern seaboard shortly before 3 p.m. local time. It has been dubbed the Great American Eclipse, and along most of its path, there live almost no black people.

    Presumably, this is not explained by the implicit bias of the solar system. It is a matter of population density, and more specifically geographic variations in population density by race, for which the sun and the moon cannot be held responsible. –Alice Ristroph, in The Atlantic

    Naturally, the article ends with a peroration condemning America for its awfulness.

    America is a nation with debts that no honest man can pay. It is too much to ask that these debts simply be forgiven. But perhaps the strange path of the eclipse suggests a need for reorganization. We have figured out, more or less, how to count every person. We have not yet found a political system in which every person counts equally. –The Atlantic

    Comment: Prof. Ristoph has a Harvard BA, JD, and PhD and teaches at Seton Hall Law School.

     Another disastrous US Naval wreck: this time, the USS John S. McCain seriously damaged, 10 sailors missing after collision with oil tanker (Fox News)

    Comment: What’s going on with our ships colliding at sea? 4th major mishap this year.

    The ship is named after Sen. McCain’s father and grandfather.

    Barcelona bombing: Hunt still on. Bomber hijacked car to escape (BBC)

    A manhunt has been extended across Europe and police say he may be armed.

    Some 90 minutes after mowing down dozens of people on the central Las Ramblas avenue, Abouyaaqoub fled to the city’s university district, police say.

    Abouyaaqoub is alleged to have hijacked the car before driving it through a police checkpoint and later abandoning the vehicle. Police say he may have crossed into France. –BBC

    Comment: Through a police checkpoint? Were they using the TSA?

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    Hat tip to Sam Stubbs for the solar eclipse story.

     

  • ZipDialog Roundup: What to Know about Barcelona and the Jihadist Attack; Friday, August 18

    Articles chosen with care. Your comments welcomed.
    Linked articles in bold purple

    ◆ Barcelona: What to Know about the Terror on Las Ramblas

    Explanation: Barcelona is one of the great cities of Europe, with a very mixed population. It has fabulous architecture and is a particularly good city for walking, strolling, having a cup of coffee outdoors. Americans think of it as “Spanish,” but it is also the capital of the Catalan region, which has its own language and which has voted to become independent. (Madrid has resisted and, unlike the Basque separatists, those in Catalan have not be violent.)

    One of Barcelona’s main spots for strolling is a pedestrian street, Las Ramblas, which runs a couple of miles from the port to a major plaza. It is next to a medieval quarter, which is also great for strolling or sitting at a cafe.

    The only vehicles permitted are those delivering merchandise to the store, and those are rare (most deliveries are at night or by small carts).

    A picture will help you understand the ambiance. 

    A Jihadist attack there was bound to kill many tourists, strike terror into the whole city, damage its vital tourist industry, and perhaps reiterate the Islamist claim that the Iberian peninsula should revert to Muslim control because, long ago, it was conquered by Islam.

    Of particular concern: The fact that the attack was so well-organized and seems to be linked to a strong support network (how else could the driver have been hidden after escape? how else would a bomb factory be found in another town?)

    Yes, there will be a lot of attention to the missed signals from the US to Spanish and Catalan authorities, as there should be.

    There will be a lot of attention to the huge, illegal migration from North Africa to Spain, a short boat ride away from Morocco.

    And there will rightly be a lot of concern about

    • The sophistication of this Islamist plot
    • The morphing of Islamist tactics as they lose their “caliphate” and send battle-hardened veterans back to Europe and North America to control local terror ops
    • The ease of killing people on sidewalks all over the world
      • If you harden one such targets, there are thousands more
      • These attacks are not limited to one city or one country; they are spread across the civilized world
    • The unregulated flow of North Africans and Middle Easterners into Europe
      • Still supported by clueless politicians, led by Germany’s Angela Merkel
    • The support network of local extremists, some of whom have lived in Europe for 2-3 generations without becoming European and accepting basic values of tolerance, peaceful contestation of grievances, and acceptance of social and religious differences
      • Note that the idea of a caliphate deeply contradicts western Europe’s hard-won achievement of separating political authority from religious authority; our leaders are not our chief priests and political dissent is not apostacy, as they are in an Islamic caliphate

    There should be deep concern about all of these issues.

    There should be much more attention to the spread of pernicious Islamist ideologies and their support from state sponsors, including Saudi Arabia, Qatar, and, of course, Iran.

    There should be deep concern about how to suppress the threats and how to do so without crushing the very liberties we seek to protect.

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  • ZipDialog Roundup for Tuesday, July 11

    Articles chosen with care. Comments welcomed. Linked articles in bold purple

     NYT: Trump Jr was told by email that his meeting with a Russian lawyer was part of a Kremlin effort to aid their campaign  The NYT has not seen the email but has been told about it by 3 anonymous people.

    Trump Jr’s lawyer says it is “much ado about nothing” and that he was simply meeting with someone who might have info that could help the campaign.

    In fairness, the Times notes that Trump Jr. has said he would be willing to meet with Congressional investigators and that he

    had a reputation during the campaign for having meetings with a wide range of people eager to speak to him, did not join his father’s administration. He runs the family business, the Trump Organization, with his brother Eric.

    Comment: The fact that Jr’s story has changed several times is not a good sign for him; it suggests he has something to conceal.

    The better news for him is that it strongly indicates to me they did not already have good contacts with the Russians (a point that I have not seen made elsewhere). If that is true, it is strong evidence that they had not been colluding prior to the June 2016.

    Final point: we don’t know yet if this meeting was a dirty trick. Could be–but if it was then why wouldn’t the Clinton people have revealed it during the campaign? They would have. So that seems unlikely.

     US soldier arrested in Hawaii for allegedly joining ISIS  (NBC)

    Ikaika Erik Kang was a convert to Islam and some of his statements lauded Hitler.

    Comment: Proper sentence: send him to Mosul for join his friends.

     Two studies say drinking more coffee leads to longer life (CNN)

    Comment: More fine research from the Starbucks Institute for Science.

     FDA: opioid pharma companies must comply with new, tougher rules to train doctors on using the painkillers properly  (Washington Post)

    Comment: A small but welcome step.

     Chicago Sun-Times Editorial: Illinois should lead the way in solar energy

    Comment: No it shouldn’t. States with a lot of sunshine should lead the way.  They have the obvious advantage.

    If Illinois wants to lead the way in energy, it should use its advantage and focus on better energy use in cold weather. Conservation is an equally important part of an overall energy strategy.

     Texas judge suspended after admitting she used ecstacy and marijuana and sexted her bailiff (Daily Mail) She also misrepresented her relationship with a convicted swindler to conceal drug purchases from him.

    Her former boyfriend [whom she was seeing while she was married] also said that they used Backpage.com on two occasions to hire prostitutes for threesomes. He said Green paid $150 to a prostitute in Houston on one occasion, and $200 to a prostitute in Austin on another.  –Daily Mail

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