• ZipDialog Roundup for June 1

    Articles chosen with care. Comments welcomed. Linked articles in bold purple

     Oddly, no new scandal today.

    No terrible new allegations or fierce rebuttals.

    No new leaks from the intelligence agencies.

    Makes me wonder if the internet is down in Washington.

     House Intel Committee Issues Subpoenas to Unmask Obama’s Unmaskers (Real Clear Politics)

    Some familiar names, but one new and important one: Samantha Power, Obama’s UN Ambassador who previously served on the National Security Council.  No one had mentioned her before, though Trey Gowdy may have hinted at her in a cryptic question last week.

    House investigators told [James Rosen at] Fox News they are now devoting more scrutiny to Power, and they have come to see her role in the unmasking as ‘larger than previously known.’ Allegedly eclipsing the others named. –Real Clear Politics

    Trump’s lawyer, Michael Cohen, was also named in the subpoenas.

     Comey will testify in public next week.

    The Democrats think of him as a White Knight, riding to the rescue.

    Republicans think of him as the Knight Who Says Ni. 

    Comment: Comey thinks of himself a

    • a white knight
    • who has done absolutely everything right and nothing wrong in his public life, and
    • is now in the fight to redeem his reputation, which, he thinks,
    • will require him to destroy Trump
    • without saying that he, Comey, failed to report obstruction of justice, as he was required to do.

    This is going to be nasty, very nasty.

     Paris Climate Discord: Trump could pull US out of it this week, as he promised during the campaign.

    The New York Times has a primer on the accord itself.

    The opposition is well framed in the op-ed in the WaPo: If Trump quits the Paris climate accord, he will lead the U.S. into the wilderness

    If the United States withdraws from the accord, it would find itself in farcically lonely company. The pact was signed by 195 countries, with only Nicaragua and Syria bowing out. . . . Some climate experts actually suggest that, given Trump’s steady dismantling of environmental protections, it’s better for the United States to leave the pact altogether than to undermine it from within.

    The other effect of a withdrawal: the disappearance of U.S. leadership on a fundamental issue affecting the future of the planet. –Washington Post op-ed

    A pro-Trump take, from the Washington Examiner: “Trump could rally GOP, reward voters with Paris Agreement exit”

    Comment: There has been a ferocious fight among Trump’s White House advisers, but it looks like the “pull out” side won.

     China sees an opening in relations with Germany after Merkel’s spat with Trump  (New York Times)

    India is also visiting Berlin.

    Comment: Germany is playing a larger global role these days. But that role will be limited unless it can round up support from other Europeans for a collective effort.

    Robert Lieber has just published a brief post on ZipDialog voicing skepticism that the Europeans really can come together. (Lieber post here.

     Solar Energy Storage systems are getting smaller, cheaper, better, allowing some solar homes to begin disconnecting from the grid (Deutsche Welle)

    Comment: Batteries and storage have been the bottleneck for a long time, and a major focus of research. Progress has been steady, but still far short of consumer needs.

     Lebanon bans new Wonder Woman movie because the lead is an Israeli actress (BBC)

    Lots of Lebanese viewers want to see it but, as one upset potential customer puts it, “a vocal minority” was against.

    Comment: Yep. The kind of vocal minority whose movie critic blows up the theater.

     

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  • ZipDialog Roundup for Thursday, April 13

    Topics and articles chosen with care. Linked articles in bold purple

     US-Russia: “Candid discussions,” as the diplomats say. The rest of us say: “frosty”

    • Sec. of State Tillerson and his Russian counterpart, Sergey Lavrov, hold a chilly press conference.
    • Pres. Trump shrewdly holds a press conference with NATO head at the same time

    NYT headline: U.S. Takes Sharper Tone on Russia’s Role in Syria

    President Trump and Secretary of State Rex W. Tillerson sought on Wednesday to isolate President Vladimir V. Putin of Russia for backing the Syrian government in the wake of its lethal chemical weapons attack on civilians, and worked to build international pressure on Moscow to change course.

    In Washington, Moscow and New York, the Trump administration publicly chastised Mr. Putin but privately worked to hash out increasingly bitter differences with him. At the same time, Mr. Trump embraced NATO — a military alliance he had previously derided as obsolete — as an effective and vital force for peace and security in a region where Russia has been an aggressive actor. –New York Times

    Comment: Right now, the issue is Syria, but tomorrow it could be Ukraine or the Baltics. There is a full plate of differences and, despite Russia’s high hopes that Trump would be a friendly patsy, he has been tougher than Obama (though not necessarily tougher than Hillary would have been). As Tillerson say today, relations are at a low point, and that’s a dangerous thing when both are bristling with nuclear weapons.

     Melania Trump, defamed by British tabloid, takes them to the cleaners. The UK’s Daily Mail pays her big money and issues an apology.Here’s what a fair headline looks like: Melania Trump wins damages from Daily Mail over ‘escort’ allegation (BBC)

    Now, watch here’s the Washington Post‘s effort to deny Melania won: Melania Trump settles lawsuits with Daily Mail.

    That headline actively avoids giving readers the story, which they could have done by using the words: “Melania Trump triumphs in lawsuit with Daily Mail”

     Today in WTF: Cursing banned at Philadelphia construction site

    The site is at Temple University, where students apparently need a lot of protection. (Fox News)

    Comment: Of course, they mostly need protection getting back and forth to school in that neighborhood. But I digress. Philadelphia is actually best known as the city that actually booed Santa Claus. (True.)

     CNN doubles down on its attack angle: Trump’s people colluded with Russia.

    Today’s CNN headline: “The Russia story just keeps getting worse for President Trump” (CNN)

    Comment: I watched some of Don Lemon’s show tonight. He had on several guests, but it was a charade. 

    The network plans to continue until an airplane is lost at sea. That always struck me as odd because airports are the main venue for CNN.

     Two men from Zion, Illinois, charged with giving support to terrorist Islamic State. (Chicago Tribune)

    Comment: Odd choice for Zionists.

     Three Steps to Making Solar Power More Efficient (Edgy Labs) Two banal, one wrong.

    1. Put solar power into the grid instead of storing it
    2. Improve the cells’ efficiency
    3. Create practical infrastructure for solar

    Comment: The last two qualify as “well, d’uh.”

    And the first one seems wrong. We do want to put it into the grid, of course, but it is intermittent so we need better storage.

    What’s right about the article is that solar installation costs are falling and greater use would reduce pollution. 

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  • ZipDialog Roundup for Saturday, March 25

    Topics and articles chosen with care. Linked articles in bold purple

     House Republicans cannot pass healthcare. What happens to the rest of their agenda? 

    The proposed reforms were blocked by fiscal conservatives.

    Big loss for Ryan, Trump.

    Americans now stuck with Obamacare as it implodes.

    Comment: Like a major earthquake, this will come with big aftershocks. The most important are 

    • Will voters go berserk over the Republicans’ failure to carry out their biggest promise over the past seven years?
    • How weakened are Ryan and Trump? Will R’s start eating their own?
    • How will this affect Trump’s proposed tax reforms, on which there are also big splits among Republicans, especially over the “border adjustment tax”?
    • What will happen to Obamacare, now that America is stuck with this clunker for the foreseeable future?

    Count on this: Republicans will do nothing to save the Affordable Care Act from self-destruction.

    Democrats will then blame R’s for not fixing the law (“every law needs a little tweaking,” they will say, disingenuously).

    Then, everybody blames everybody for the resulting mess and real pain as insurers pull out of the market, rates go up, and so on.

     Aftermath of the Jerry Sandusky scandal:  Jury finds Penn State ex-president Graham Spanier guilty on one count of child endangerment (Morning Call, Allentown, PA)

    Spanier was acquitted of the more serious felony charges, but the jury said he still did not do enough to stop Jerry Sandusky’s predations. He could face up to 5 years in prison.

    Note to ZipDialog readers: When stories have strong local content, as this one does, I look for the best local news sources. Their reporters know the stories in more depth.

     Ed Secretary Betsy DeVos touts affordable higher education during visit to Orlando community college  (Naples Daily News, FL)

    Comment: This story has a personal meaning for me. My son, Jon, graduated from this college, Valencia, and transferred his credits to the University of Central Florida, also in Orlando.

    I completely agree with DeVos’ point about affordability, not only because tuition is low but also because students often live at home and work part-time.

     A Federal judge in VA rules Trump’s travel ban is constitutional. No practical effect since two other judges have ruled the other way. (CNN)

    California Upholds Auto Emissions Standards, Setting Up Face-Off With Trump  (New York Times)

    Mr. Trump, backing industry over environmental concerns, said easing emissions rules would help stimulate auto manufacturing. He vowed last week to loosen the regulations. . . . .

    But California can write its own standards because of a longstanding waiver granted under the Clean Air Act, giving the state — the country’s biggest auto market — major sway over the auto industry. Twelve other states, including New York and Pennsylvania, as well as Washington, D.C., follow California’s standards . . . .

    Now, the question is how — or whether — the Trump administration will handle California’s dissent. The administration could choose to revoke California’s waiver, at which point experts expect the state would sue. –New York Times

     Next month, Tesla will start taking orders for its new solar roof tiles  (Bloomberg) Will look like regular tiles from most angles. Likely to be a premium product since they mimic terra cotta and slate.

    The roof tiles are made of textured glass. From most viewing angles, they look just like ordinary shingles, but they allow light to pass through from above onto a standard flat solar cell. The plan is for Panasonic Corp. to produce the solar cells at Tesla’s factory in Buffalo and for Tesla to put together the glass tiles and everything that goes along with them. –Bloomberg

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  • ZipDialog Roundup for Friday, March 24

    Topics and articles chosen with care. Linked articles in bold purple

     Repeal and Replace goes down to the wire. Vote postponed Thursday, will happen Friday

    The Washington Post reports the President gave holdouts a clear choice: “Trump delivers ultimatum to House Republicans: Pass health-care measure on Friday or he’ll move on”

    The move was a high-risk gamble for the president and the speaker, who have invested significant political capital in passing legislation that would replace the 2010 Affordable Care Act. For Trump, who campaigned as a skilled negotiator capable of forging a good deal on behalf of Americans, it could either vindicate or undercut one of his signature claims. If the measure fails, it would be a defeat for Trump in his first effort to help pass major legislation and it may also jeopardize other items on his wish list, including a tax overhaul and infrastructure spending.

    Defeat would also mean that Obamacare — something that congressional Republicans have railed against for seven years — would remain in place. –Washington Post

     Democrats Plan to Filibuster Supreme Court nominee, Neil Gorsuch  (New York Times)

    To break the filibuster, the Republicans need 60 votes and, according to the NYT, they don’t have the 8 Democrats they need to do that.

    Comment: Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer is playing to his enraged, activist base. I see two main consequences, one for elections, two for the Senate.

    1. D’s from states Trump won by significant margins are made much more vulnerable. They will have to vote with the party base or the larger electorate in their states.
    2. Mitch McConnell will toss out the 60 vote filibuster rule for Supreme Court  nominees, following Harry Reid’s precedent in overturning it for all other federal appointments.
      • McConnell didn’t hold this position open–blocking hearings for Obama nominee, Merrick Garland–to let the Democrats block this appointment.
    3. The change in Senate rules, executed mostly by Reid, alters that body in fundamental ways. It now looks much more like the House, where a simple majority is enough to ram through legislation if you can whip your party in line.

     The NYT’s spin misses the main story:

    Their headline: Devin Nunes Puts Credibility of House Panel He Leads in Doubt

    The real headline story:  Devin Nunes says he has hard evidence the Trump Transition team was spied on; Hints at “smoking gun” connecting spying to Obama Administration (ZipDialog post)

    Nancy Pelosi clearly did not like Nunes’ doing this. She called him a stooge. Presumable the 4th one.

     London’s terror killer identified as Khalid Masood  Now, the Brits want to know how he slipped through their net (Independent, UK)

    Comment: Actually, he slipped through the net twice. The intel services didn’t connect his name to terrorism; they just knew him as a criminal. At this point, nobody knows whether he was connected to a wider network or not. Second, Masood slipped through an open gate and got very near Parliament itself.

    That said, British and European counter-terrorism services face overwhelming tasks. Decades of anti-Western immigrants, who have failed to assimilate, have been systematically ignored by political leaders who thought–quite wrongly–that “nobody would come to Britain [or Belgium or France or ….] unless they wanted to become like us.” Nope. And simply celebrating it as “multiculturalism” turned out to be a catastrophic failure, as Theresa May has recognized.  

    This problem goes far beyond beefing up domestic intelligence and policing. That’s part of the answer, but the problem is much larger.

     Former Russian lawmaker, critical of Putin, gunned down in broad daylight in Ukraine’s capital, Kiev. (CNN) Denis Voronenkov joins a long line of former Putin critics. The suspected killer was himself killed by Voronenkov’s bodyguard.

    Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko called Thursday’s killing a “Russian state terrorist act” on Twitter, and described Voronenkov as “one of the key witnesses of the Russian aggression against Ukraine” — referring to Russia’s 2014 annexation of Ukraine’s Crimea region and a subsequent war with pro-Russian rebels. –CNN

    Ukraine’s president called it an “act of terrorism.”

    Comment: This killing makes Pres.-elect Trump’s excuses for Putin, especially those in his 2017 Super Bowl interview with Bill O’Reilly, all the more noxious (Transcript here)

    “But he’s a killer though,” O’Reilly said. “Putin’s a killer.”

    “There are a lot of killers,” Trump responded. “We’ve got a lot of killers. What do you think — our country’s so innocent.”

     Bright Future for Solar Energy in India: Hopes for a booming domestic market and exports of solar panels manufactured there (Business Insider) PM Narendra Modi wants to spend over $3 billion aiding the industry. In a country where some 300 million are not connected to the grid, the government hopes to draw 40% of its energy from renewables by 2030.

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  • ZipDialog’s Roundup of News Beyond the Front Page . . Monday, February 6

    Hand-picked and farm-fresh–
    Linked articles in bold purple

     “Trump and Staff Rethink Tactics After Stumbles” (New York Times)

    The bungled rollout of his executive order barring immigrants from seven predominantly Muslim countries, a flurry of other miscues and embarrassments, and an approval rating lower than that of any comparable first-term president in the history of polling have Mr. Trump and his top staff rethinking an improvisational approach to governing that mirrors his chaotic presidential campaign, administration officials and Trump insiders said.

    This account of the early days of the Trump White House is based on interviews with dozens of government officials . . . At the center of the story, according to these sources, is a president determined to go big but increasingly frustrated by the efforts of his small team to contain the backlash. –New York Times

    Comment: Some of the new administration’s problems are the policies themselves. Others are the failure to vet them carefully before rolling them out. Still others are failures to think through the details of implementation.

    Some, such as communications, vetting, and implementation, should improve as the administration learns the ropes, assuming Chief of Staff Reince Priebus is given scope to fix these issues. 

    Initial reports were that Trump dismissed the early problems as minor glitches that were overblown by a hostile media. Recent reports are that he now sees the problems as more serious–and more damaging. The media is hostile, of course, but the Trump administration’s serious mistakes have given reporters plenty of grist.

    I assume the President is getting candid feedback from VP Pence, as well as Speaker Paul Ryan and Majority Leader Mitch McConnell. They will surely tell Trump that massive screwups, like the immigration mess and thin-skinned tweets, can imperil his big initiatives on taxes, regulations, and health care. If the President doesn’t know that already, he will learn it soon . . . the hard way. (Charles Lipson comment)

     Republicans and Trump supporters attack news reporting as biased

    One scorching, well-documented attack on media coverage is Clarice Feldman’s column: The Press Eunuchs Ratting Their Cups (American Thinker)

     “Trump’s Continued Defense of Putin Confounds Republicans(Washington Post)

    He seemed to equate the United States with its adversary when pressed by host Bill O’Reilly, who said: “But he’s a killer, though. Putin’s a killer.”

    “There are a lot of killers,” Trump said in the interview, which aired Sunday before the Super Bowl. “We’ve got a lot of killers. What do you think? Our country’s so innocent?”

    Trump’s comments came even as his U.N. envoy, ­Nikki Haley, on Thursday condemned Russia’s “aggressive actions” in eastern Ukraine and as both the Senate and House intelligence committees launched investigations into alleged hacking by Russia of the U.S. election that the intelligence community believes was intended to benefit Trump.–Washington Post

     Good economic news from Germany: Factory orders surge, due to demand for capital goods (Bloomberg)

    Comment: The German economy is Europe’s driver. Strong performance there not only helps Germany, it helps all its trading partners. Good economic news is particularly welcome for Chancellor Angela Merkel, whose popularity has plummeted because of her immigration policies.

     Google “Home” apparently doesn’t like being talked about on TV  (USA Today)

    Google used the Super Bowl to plug its Google Home connectivity service, but the TV commercial apparently confused the systems in homes of those who already have it. For them, Google Home went whacko.

    Those who already have Google Home took to Twitter to complain that it interfered with their units. Apparently, the home systems heard the TV broadcasts calling its name, and it became befuddled. –USA Today

     China is now the world’s largest producer of solar power  The smog problems in Beijing are legendary. And the country is constantly building more coal-fired power plants. But it is also adding solar capacity. Non-fossil fuels currently account for 11% of Chinese energy–and solar only 1%–but Beijing planners hope to triple renewables over the next 15 years.

     Congratulations to NFL players, Eli Manning and Larry Fitzgerald, honored with the league’s Walter Payton Award for their charity work. Manning, who starred at Ole Miss, is the NY Giants’ Quarterback. Fitzgerald is wide receiver for the Arizona Cardinals. The generosity of these players–and many others–sets a standard for the rest of us.

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  • ZipDialog’s Roundup of News Beyond the Front Page . . Monday, January 23

    Hand-picked and farm-fresh–
    Linked articles in bold purple

     Chuck Schumer, the Democrats’ leader in the Senate, has been slow-walking Pres. Trump’s Cabinet nominees. 21 need Senate approval; only two have received it.  Some of the fault is the nominees. Some were named late and many have very complex finances, which require disclosure, resolution of conflicts of interest, and the signature of ethics forms. But this is also a Democratic political stratagem.

    Comment: I don’t think this slowdown is smart politics for the Democrats, but that is hard to judge because their donor base may like it (even if it alienates ordinary voters).

    Whether it is smart politics or not, it harms the country not to have a full complement of senior executives running their departments.

     The political lawsuits begin, aiming to tie up Trump presidency  NYT headline: “Foreign Payments to Trump Firms Violate Constitution, Suit Will Claim”

    The lawsuit is among a barrage of legal actions against the Trump administration that have been initiated or are being planned by major liberal advocacy organizations. Such suits are among the few outlets they have to challenge the administration now that Republicans are in control of the government.

    In the new case, the lawyers argue that a provision in the Constitution known as the Emoluments Clause bans payments from foreign powers like the ones to Mr. Trump’s companies. They cite fears among the framers of the Constitution that United States officials could be corrupted by gifts or payments. –New York Times

     Trump immediately begins negotiations with Canada and Mexico on NAFTA (CNN) The story contained no specifics.

     Chicago’s free-fire zones continue: 5 Dead, 44 Wounded over Weekend (Chicago Sun-Times)

     Solar panel prices continue to drop: good for consumers, bad for producers. Some producers are now losing money, but the industry is booming. Prices for home systems that recently ran $30,000 are now half that cost or less. The biggest producers are Chinese, but their home country is now the world’s largest solar market. (PRI)

     Tweets from Katharine Hayhoe, Jay Nordlinger, and Austin Knuppe

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    zd-hat-tip-facing-inward-100px-w-margin♥ Hat Tip for helpful suggestions:
    ◆ Michael Lipson
     for Dallas Stars’ attendance

     

  • ZipDialog’s Roundup of News Beyond the Front Page . . Friday, January 13

    Hand-picked and farm-fresh–
    Linked articles in bold purple

     Barone on Trump and the Intelligence Community  Michael Barone, always worth reading, has a nicely-balanced opinion piece on Trump, Russia, and the intel community. Pressing Trump hard to clarify his views about Russia are absolutely “in bounds” for serious journalists and policymakers. But it should be out of bounds to circulate sleazy, unverified dossiers about him. News organizations should first do what the reputable ones are doing: investigate and see if the allegations can be substantiated.  If they cannot be substantiated, don’t publish. And don’t spread gossip.

    It’s Barone’s second point that is so troubling. There is a real possibility that the intelligence community is behind the leaked document. If so–and they have vigorously denied it–then that is very disturbing.

    I lack knowledge of just how the 35-page dodgy dossier found its way into the computerized hands of BuzzFeed. But what we’re seeing looks an awful lot like an attempt to intelligence officials, probably including presidential employees, to delegitimize the president-elect and his administration. It’s in line with the warnings to Trump by Senate Minority Leader Charles Schumer not to tangle with the intelligence community.

    That’s disturbing, even if you are troubled also, as I am, by Trump’s persistent unwillingness to criticize and persistent propensity to praise Vladimir Putin. –Michael Barone

     Touching: Pres. Obama presents the Presidential Medal of Freedom to Joe Biden, who is overcome with emotion  A wonderful gesture by Pres. Obama, in recognition of Joe Biden’s decades in public service.

     Strong appearance by James Mattis, nominee for Sec. of Defense  He sailed through the confirmation-hearing questions and presented a strong, thoughtful analysis of US strategic posture and military preparedness. The Financial Times headline: “James Mattis calls Vladimir Putin a threat to global order”

    ⇒ The NYT Take is characteristically snarky: Latest to Disagree With Donald Trump: His Cabinet Nominees

     Sen. Minority Leader, Chuck Schumer, and Dems to vote against Jeff Sessions for Attorney General. They oppose him on a wide range of civil-rights issue. (New York Daily News)

    Other Democrats weighed in against Sessions throughout the day, highlighting concerns about his controversial views on immigrants, civil rights, voting rights, disability rights, LGBTQ rights and women’s rights.

     “Trump’s Pick for Education Could Face Unusually Stiff Resistance,” says NYT. The story (here) focuses on potential conflicts of interest related to Betsy DeVos’s $5 billion fortune. She has not yet completed her ethics forms and the Democrats are complaining.

    Comment: That’s the issue the Times and Democrats are focusing on today, but it is a side-show. The real issue–the one that should be joined as a public-policy debate–is about increasing school choice via charters, vouchers, and other approaches. The problem for Democrats is that, even in today’s hyperpartisan environment, the rule is normally “the President gets his cabinet choices unless they have legal or ethical problems.” The policy debates come afterwards.

    But Education, Justice, and Environmental Protection are departments so central to the Democrats’ agenda and so vital to their donors that they will tooth and nail to kill these nominations

     Plunging costs for solar energy leads to greater use in Arab Gulf  CNBC reports the surprising rise of solar energy in the land of oil.

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    zd-hat-tip-facing-inward-100px-w-margin♥ Hat Tip for helpful suggestions:
    ◆ Michael Lipson
     for the Biden story

     

  • ZipDialog’s Roundup of News Beyond the Front Page . . Sat., Dec. 3

    Hand-picked and farm-fresh–
    Linked articles in bold purple

    ◆ Why did Trump speak with Taiwan’s leader? As the NYT puts it, “Trump Speaks With Taiwan’s Leader, an Affront to China” The Times notes Trump’s call was

    a striking break with nearly four decades of diplomatic practice that could precipitate a major rift with China even before Mr. Trump takes office.–New York Times

    China’s leaders blast Trump’s call as “petty,” according to the Washington Post.

    china-and-taiwan-map-labeled-200pxComment: The NYT–and lots of my friends–are saying Trump is naive, an idiot, and, as one put it, a “loose cannon.”

    I think there’s more purpose and less impulse here; this is not one of his late-night tweets. One way to read this is that Trump is saying that his administration, unlike Obama’s, will stand with America’s friends and allies. It is also signaling China, very early, that Trump means to get different outcomes on big issues such as trade, North Korean provocations, and China’s unilateralism in the South China Sea. In short, he is likely informing Beijing that he negotiates harder deals than the gang-that-can’t shoot-straight, now occupying the White House and National Security Council, and that he can identify America’s friends and enemies clearly. (Charles Lipson comment)

    clarice-feldman-clarices-pieces◆ A glorious tribute to the op-eds of Clarice Feldman by my friend Belladonna Rogers. (PJ Media)

    Clarice writes a powerful piece every Sunday for the American Thinker blog.

    Belladonna is a Tweeter extraordinary at @BeladonnaRogers

    keith_ellison-labeled-small◆ Democrats still trying to pick head of their national committee. Keith Ellison, a US Rep. from Minnesota, has picked up all the major endorsements and his major opponent, Howard Dean, just dropped out. But Ellison is still encountering resistance, according to Politico. That’s surprising, although some nit-pickers observe that he was a member of Louis Farrakhan’s Nation of Islam and has not broken sharply from all those views. Those nit-pickers do not include Politico, whose article does not mention the Nation of Islam or Ellison’s more recent interviews, saying Israel still controls the US.

    Comment: (a) Failing to mention why some Jewish organizations and donors oppose Ellison is journalistic malpractice at Politico.
    (b) Republicans are rubbing their hands in glee at the thought that Democrats could pick Ellison; they think he will lead the party over the cliff.

    denial-statue-200px◆ Today in Denial: a big Rolling Stone article entitled: “Donald Trump: Loser in Chief”  (Rolling Stone)

    The magazine has strongly supported Pres. Obama, which earned its owner, Jann Wenner, a one-on-one interview with the President after the election.

    Comment: Unlike the magazine’s reporting on the University of Virginia, the election actually happened.

    ◆ A debate over how bad Donald Trump’s administration will be for Renewable Energy (Forbes) The bottom line is there is considerable policy uncertainty, especially about subsidies (many of which are state and local). Even so, says Earl Ritchie

    It looks virtually certain that renewables growth will continue, but at a much-reduced pace. –Earl J. Ritchie at Forbes

    Ritchie is a retired energy executive, who teaches a course on the oil and gas industry at the University of Houston

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     detective-cartoon-see-something-say-something-no-caption-201px

    ◆ Send interesting stories to
    Charles (dot) Lipson at Gmail (dot) com

     

     

  • ZipDialog’s Roundup of News Beyond the Front Page . . Friday, Nov 11

    Hand-picked and farm-fresh–
    Linked articles in bold purple

    ◆ November 11: Veterans Dayveterans-day-300px-no-margins

     

    A serious analysis of why the polls got it wrong. 

    zd-polling-201px-w-marginsThe author, Milt Rosenberg, is known by millions for hosting one of the country’s most interesting talk shows. But his “day job” was always as a professor of social pyschology, with special expertise on polling bias. His analysis emphasizes “evaluation apprehension,” in which respondents fail to report their views accurately to pollsters for fear they will be judged negatively. (American Spectator)

    ◆ ‘Not my president’: Thousands protest Trump in rallies across the US (Washington Post)

     NY Daily News, which hates Trump, runs this headline: President-elect Donald Trump complains about ‘unfair’ protesters

    clinton-foundation-300px-no-margins◆ IRS sued for Clinton Foundation Documents (Fox)

    Comment on the Foundation: The Clinton Foundation is extremely vulnerable to a thorough, honest investigation by a neutral DOJ. But it is vital that a Trump Administration act with probity. If this investigation looks like vengeance or retribution, it will be as bad as the Obama DOJ.

    Comment on the Clintons’ Personal Enrichment: For anyone who thought it was not influence buying to hire Bill and Hillary for speaking fees of $400k-$750k, or hiring Bill as an “honorary chancellor” of a private university for $16 million, ask yourself this:

    Is anybody willing to pay the Clintons those astronomical rates now? Why not? Because the Clintons are out of power for good. Not temporarily. They are never coming back.

    No investor buys an option that will expire worthless. And people paying them those fees were “investing” in the Clintons. (Charles Lipson comment)

    energy-composite-solar-coal-nat-gas-oil-fracking-labeled-300-no-margins◆ What will a Trump Presidency Mean for Energy? Good News for Oil and Gas. Bad News for Solar  (Buffalo News, republished in GovTech) Growth was already slowing in the solar industry, but Trump’s recognition that low BTU prices mean economic growth translates into pro-oil and gas policies, not subsidies for higher cost renewables.

    ◆ Thanks to so many of you for reading my op-ed at Real Clear Politics: What Happens After the Electoral Earthquake?

     

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