• It’s the Chicago “Safe Summer” sports league, so what could possibly go wrong?

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    “The whole idea behind it was to keep kids safe.

    And then it evolved into what it did,” said Chicago Police Superintendent Eddie Johnson. (Chicago Tribune story here.)

    According to the Tribune:

    Police finally canceled the event after fighting broke out. At least one video circulating on social media showed two girls brawling with each other as some people in the crowd jumped in, striking the women. –Chicago Tribune

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  • Kudos to a Chicago DA fighting FOR a prisoner’s rights

    Normally, the prosecutor gives a big “thumbs up” when a judge keeps a suspect in jail.

    Not this time.

    The second-ranking prosecutor in Cook County (Chicago) not only gave a thumbs down, he risked contempt of court by arguing so vociferously against the judge.

    • The judge: Nicholas Ford, known for his tough sentences.
    • The prosecutor: Eric Sussman. (Full disclosure: I have known Eric all his life.)
    • The defendant: Karen Padilla, held on several charges and mother of a new baby, born in jail

    The Chicago Tribune reports (link here):

    A longtime Cook County judge and a top prosecutor repeatedly shouted at each other Monday at a tense hearing over whether a pregnant woman should have been jailed without bail for more than a month this summer.

    “I have every right to hold her,” said Judge Nicholas Ford, a former prosecutor known for imposing tough sentences.

    “You do not!” countered First Assistant State’s Attorney Eric Sussman, his voice raised.

    At times, the argument grew so heated that the two talked over each other, making their comments nearly unintelligible, as Karen Padilla stood nearby with her 3-week-old daughter strapped on her chest in a carrier. –Chicago Tribune

    The defendant, Padilla, had several significant charges pending, none violent. Her current problems began when she was pulled over for a traffic violation, admitted that she had no driving license, and, when her records were checked, was found to have an outstanding arrest warrant (she was charged with pocketing customers’ payments at a restaurant where she worked).

    So, she was taken to jail and was scheduled for a hearing, where she might be released, pending a trial date.

    Because her hearing was delayed (no judge was available, apparently), the 25-year-old mother stayed in jail and gave birth there.

    “Mr. Sussman, this is simple,” [Judge] Ford said.

    “No, it’s not,” Sussman interjected, his voice raised, and the two again began to shout over each other.

    “She had to give birth to her daughter in jail!” said Sussman, noting that Padilla couldn’t afford to pay restitution or fees as she was ordered. “This is not a debtor’s prison you’re running, your honor … and you illegally sentenced her to jail.”

    “I didn’t sentence her to anything,” Ford shot back. –Chicago Tribune

    Padilla was ultimately released on her on own recognizance.

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    Comment: I couldn’t be prouder of Eric Sussman for his conduct in this case.

    I know his family shares that pride.

    I only wish his father, Art (himself a very distinguished attorney), were here with mom Rita to smile at the work Eric is doing and the values he is fighting for.

  • Actual headline: City Of Chicago Offers Advice In Event Of Nuclear Attack

    Here’s the apocalyptic story (CBS2 Chicago)

    And here is the actual page on the City of Chicago website.

    Let me paraphrase:

    1. You still owe your real-estate taxes and parking tickets, even if your house and car are burnt toast
    2. If you live on the South Side or West Side, remember: you are still at risk of drive-by shootings
    3. If you live near a church with a “nuclear-free zone” sign, you may ignore all warnings. You are safe and smug.
      • Also, please note that even a nuclear blast cannot crack the shell of your moral superiority
    4. Please replace your old City of Chicago flag with the newly-redesigned one below

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  • Teamsters official says he is retiring “to begin the next chapter” in his life. He didn’t mention the extortion indictment

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    The labor leader is John Coli, Sr., who has been with Teamsters for 46 years and is “considered one the union’s most powerful figures nationally,” according to the Chicago Tribune (story here).

    The feds charged him with

    threatening work stoppages and other labor unrest for a business –identified only as Company 1–unless he was paid quarterly cash payoffs of $25,000.

    They say he had accepted five payoffs, the last one in April.

    Coli is well-connected politically. He has cultivated strong ties to leaders in both parties–Illinois Governors Blagojevich, Quinn, Rauner, it doesn’t matter whether they are D’s or R’s–and to the Chicago Democrats, including Mayor Rahm Emanuel, for whom he worked actively and contributed generously.

    Comment: A very thorough investigation of his finances should prove interesting, and I’m sure the Feds are itching to do it.

    If the feds can prove these threats and payoffs were a regular practice, then a lot of money should have flowed in over the years, leaving Coli with a lot of good cheer to spread around.

     

  • ZipDialog Roundup for Sunday, July 9

    Articles chosen with care. Comments welcomed. Linked articles in bold purple

     Donald Trump, Jr., says he, Paul Manafort, and other campaign aides met with a Russian lawyer. The New York Times (here) and Washington Post (here) both play this as big news, but they don’t explain why. The Russian lawyer is connected to Putin’s circle, though it is not clear if Jr. or others knew. It was a brief meeting (20 minutes) and mostly raised the issue of resuming US adoptions in Russia.

    Comment: There are two reasons the meeting could be significant.

    First, Trump’s people had earlier denied any meetings at all. There was at least this one brief meeting.  Were there more? Did they go anywhere?

    Second, there is speculation (at the Daily Beast) the meeting was surreptitiously set up by a Democratic group, the Fusion GPS people. These are the fine folks who produced the dicey dossier on Trump. We don’t know a lot about Fusion GPS, including which Democrats paid for their services and why they were hired, but they seem to be part of an opposition research program. If that speculation pans out, then it looks like the Democrats were leading Trump’s people into a trap–not because anything really happened at the meeting but because the mere fact of a meeting with Russians looks bad in this increasingly anti-Russian environment.

    So far, a lotta would-a, could-a. Not much did-a, so far.

     ISIS, its “caliphate” in ruins, its capital of Raqqa about to fall, still inspires jihadis globally (New York Times)

    In Iraq, the group still controls Tal Afar, Hawija, other towns and much of Anbar Province. In Syria, most of its top operatives have fled Raqqa in the past six months for other towns still under ISIS control in the Euphrates River valley . . . .

    Many have relocated to Mayadeen, a town 110 miles southeast of Raqqa near oil facilities and with supply lines through the surrounding desert. They have taken with them the group’s most important recruiting, financing, propaganda and external operations functions, American officials said. Other leaders have been spirited out of Raqqa by a trusted network of aides. –New York Times

    Comment: About 18% of the ISIS-inspired attacks in Europe and North America involved fighters who returned from the battlefield. The other 82% were terrorists who had not been on the battlefield but were “inspired” by ISIS propaganda and radical imams, either in-person on online.

    Since these are typically low-tech attacks on soft targets, such as pedestrians on sidewalks, they are very hard to stop.

     The latest in aggie tech: farms inside shipping containers, using precise LEDs (Washington Post)

    Local Roots, a California company, has created an indoor farm that can turn any produce into local produce, anywhere. They grow fruits and vegetables in shipping containers that are stacked in old warehouses or parking lots, which can either be connected to the grid or, eventually, powered by solar energy. Local Roots has designed the custom growing technology and hardware, and it owns and operates the farms, selling its produce to restaurants and food distributors under its own brand. The fact that the company is vertically integrated differentiates it from other container farming systems. . . .

    Local Roots has figured out how to make the farm efficient enough that it can sell produce at a comparable cost to conventionally-grown fruits and veggies.

     Parental vetoes? Reports they are increasingly concerned about children attending universities with little tolerance for different ideas, little protection for free speech, and a uniform, “progressive” ideology (Inside Higher Ed)

    Comment: The parents are absolutely right. But the impact of the “parental veto” is probably exaggerated.

    There is no evidence that top schools like Brown are pinched–or intend to change. They still get the cream-of-the-SAT-crop and teach them to march in lock-step ideologically.

     Corrupt Illinois totters along: Passed the first budget in two years, huge tax increases, ZERO reforms  As the Chicago Tribune reports:

    Illinois’ bruising two-year run without a state budget is over, but business leaders are left feeling they got the short end of the stick: higher taxes with virtually none of the regulatory and political changes they sought.

    The $36.1 billion budget plan increases the corporate income tax rate to 7 percent from 5.25 percent and the personal rate to 4.95 percent from 3.75 percent. –Chicago Tribune

    Comment: The Democrats delivered for the public-sector unions and shafted taxpayers, once again. 

     This is real. I swear.

    Comment: It sounds eerily like the scene at the Star Wars bar.

     

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    zd-hat-tip-facing-inward-100px-w-margin♥ Hat Tip for helpful suggestions:
    ◆ Ed Vidal
    for the article on parental vetoes of elite colleges
    ◆ Christina Sommers for VIDA survey

     

  • How bad is Illinois credit? Worse than customers at an East St. Louis Pawn Shop

    Make no mistake: the splat will be painful–very painful.

    And it will be felt by everyday folks across the state.

    It is likely to start after the Independence Day break, when we enter the third fiscal year without a state budget–or the revenues to meet current expenses.

    The bond agencies that rate states, municipalities, and corporations are likely to respond by downgrading Illinois’ debt to junk-bond status, the first time that has happened to a state in modern US history.

    That low-credit-rating raises borrowing costs significantly.

    At the same time, the failure to pass a balanced budget means the state cannot meet current expenses.

    Taken together, the credit downgrade and failure to pass a budget mean Illinois cannot fully fund current outlays out of current income and it cannot borrow without paying through the nose. For sketchy borrowers like Illinois, lenders demand a risk-premium; otherwise, they would be better off lending to more creditworthy clients. That is the happy position Illinois and Wisconsin are in, thanks to prudent fiscal managewment.

    What happens, starting in July?

    Road repair and construction will stop immediately.

    Schools across the state, including Chicago’s massive system, won’t have the money to open in August since local districts depend on state contributions.

    Out-of-state vendors have already stopped doing business with the state for fear they won’t be paid. That includes the multi-state lottery, Powerball.

    In-state vendors, whose payments have been delayed for years, are thinking about stopping sales to the state.

    Social services for the poor, sick, and elderly, already cut to the bone, will be cut further.

    Day-to-day, there is already too little revenue to pay state bills so the comptroller has been prioritizing.

    But there are limits to what she can do, and those may be further constrained by federal court cases, demanding the state pay for certain required services. If the state paid for those requirements first, there would be no money left for anything else.

    Uncharted waters

    There are no federal provisions for states taking bankruptcy, where creditors take a haircut and there are orderly work-out procedures, so we are moving into uncharted waters.

    As some early-modern maps said: Cave! hic sunt dragones

    Warning, there are dragons here.

    There are, indeed, dragons lurking–and they are hungry.

  • Fancy Names for Left-Wing Anti-Semitism (my latest at Real Clear Politics)

    The celebrations in this weekend’s Chicago Gay Pride festival were marred by one mean-spirited moment. The organizers of the “Dyke March” blocked Jewish women from participating because they carried a gay-pride banner that included a Star of David.

    “It made us feel unsafe,” the organizers actually said, before launching into their rant against Israel and those who support it.)

    This episode is not only noxious in its own right, it highlights several problems that are now pervasive on the left and increasingly pollute America’s public life.

    The most important is the growing public expression of anti-Semitism, much of it fueled by the strange alliance between progressives (such as the Dyke March organizers) and rabid anti-Israel activists, led by Palestinians.

    In this column (link here), I

    • explain the logic behind this alliance,
    • decode the fancy words used to hold it together (such as “intersectionality”), and
    • highlight their penchant for suppressing dissent rather than engaging it.

    These larger problems deserve exposure.

    They deserve censure, too, when they violate our democratic norms of tolerance, free speech, and open debate. That’s what this column does.

    To continuing reading at Real Clear Politics, click here.

  • ZipDialog Roundup for Tuesday, May 23

    Articles chosen with care. Comments welcomed. Linked articles in bold purple

    ◆ My comment on the vile terror bombing in Manchester is posted separately (here).

    May the innocents rest in peace.

    May the wounded recover fully, in body and mind.

    May the police be safe as they root out the terrorists who prepared and executed this heinous act.

    These prayers have been said far too many times. And we fear this will not be the last time.

     Academic malpractice: Highly-esteemed professor at Duke Divinity School resigns after being attacked for not attending the university’s re-education and training camp for diversity.

    The story is here at The Weekly Standard.

    When Prof. Paul Griffiths refused to attend the “Racial Equity Institute Phase I Training” (it must have been named by Orwell) and explained his reasons, the Dean of the Divinity school attacked with full fury. According to Griffiths, Dean Elaine Heath

    initiates financial and administrative reprisals against Griffiths. Those reprisals ban him from faculty meetings, and, thereby, from voting in faculty affairs; and promise (contra the conditions stated in his letter of appointment) to ban him from future access to research or travel funds. –The Weekly Standard

    The faculty member who runs the re-education and peasant labor camp “launched her own disciplinary proceeding against Griffiths with Duke’s Office of Institutional Equity (OIE).”

    Griffiths’ refusal to attend and his explanation made her workplace “hostile,” naturally. If the PC deans and faculty had their way, Griffiths would be sent to the countryside to plant and harvest rice and learn from the honest peasants.

    The article concludes with a powerful comment by the author, Charlotte Allen:

    It’s hard to figure out what’s more appalling about this episode: the ease with which powerful faculty members can strip their colleagues of their ability to do their jobs just because those colleagues exercise free speech and don’t sign on to their ideological priorities—or the increasing power of bloated university bureaucracies, especially “diversity” bureaucracies over every facet of existence at a university that is supposed to be devoted to the life of the mind. –Charlotte Allen in The Weekly Standard

    Peter Berkowitz, another acute observer of academic follies, has an excellent piece on this Duke fiasco at the Wall Street Journal.

    Comment: Shame on Duke, a school repeatedly cloaked in politically-motivated misdeeds. They seem to learn nothing from their mistakes.

    Bravo to Paul Griffiths, distinguished professor of Catholic theology, who deserves a badge for his intellectual courage. I hope he retains counsel and goes after the malefactors.

     At Dartmouth, somewhat better news

    First the bad news: the university selected as its new dean of the faculty a professor (N. Bruce Duthu) who helped lead his professional association to boycott and sanction all Israeli universities and the professors who work there.

    This sort of thing passes virtually unnoticed among university administrators, who probably missed it when they reviewed Duthu’s qualifications.

    But outside the ivied walls, people did notice it. The university defended him, said he was a swell fellow, and, after some hesitation, he eventually said he had changed his mind about boycotting and sanctioning everything from Israel.

    The good news: after national publicity about his anti-Israel views, Duthu has decided that he shouldn’t take accept the Deanship after all.

    Here’s the story at the Observer.

    Comment: Kudos to Paul Miller and Haym Salomon Center for publicizing Duthu’s role in the BDS (Boycott, Divest, Sanction) movement. Ultimately, what Prof. Duthu did behind closed academic doors couldn’t be justified to a larger audience of Dartmouth faculty, alums, trustees, donors, and others. 

     World’s first operational robot-cop has started work in Dubai. They want them to make up about 1/3 of their police force by 2030. (Daily Mirror, UK)

    Fox News also has a report:

    The Robocop, five feet five inches tall and weighing 220 pounds, speaks six languages and reads facial expressions.

    “He can chat and interact, respond to public queries, shake hands and offer a military salute,” Brigadier-General Khalid Nasser Al Razzouqi, Director-General of Smart Services with the Dubai Police told the Mirror.

    Residents can use the Robocop to pay fines or report crimes, and it also can transmit and receive messages from police headquarters. –Fox News

     Chicago clinches spot as great food city: America’s first Nutella Cafe to open in City of Big Stomachs next week  (Chicago Eater)

     Metaphor alert: Huge sinkhole forms near Trump’s Mar-A-Lago (Forbes)

     The headlines about Betsy DeVos’ speech focused on her promise that “more school choice is coming.” That’s big, if vague.

    But she said something equally important: education should not be run from Washington (USA Today)

    Comment: Exactly right, she, Trump, and the Republicans are beginning to turn around decades of increasing centralization of educational decisionmaking in DC.

    Washington can help by allowing all kinds of experimentation. Let cities and states figure out what works and what fits best in different locales.

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