• ZipDialog Roundup for Friday, June 30

    Articles chosen with care. Comments welcomed. Linked articles in bold purple

     Trump’s twitter fury, aimed at MSNBC’s Morning Joe and its hosts, Joe Scarborough and Mika Brzezinski

    The Washington Post headline says, quite accurately: ” Trump and ‘Morning Joe’: How a long and ugly feud just got even uglier

    Comments: 

    1. Yes, Scarborough and Brzezinski have said outrageous, hyperbolic, defamatory things about Donald Trump
      • Many other media outlets have done the same
      • Far more show consistent partisan bias, damaging their reputations, hurting the President, and eroding trust in media
    2. No, that is absolutely no excuse for the President of the United States to respond with noxious, personal attacks
      • Trump’s response would be objectionable, but not so different from many Twitter spats, if he were merely a private citizen
      • But he is not a private citizen and should not be held to those standards. As President, he is not only a political figure, he is the head of state. One requirement of that office is to maintain dignity and decorum consistent with the office.

    Politically, this is self-inflicted damage to Trump. Few approve it except for his most avid supporters. And it takes him off-message, at a time when Americans want results on healthcare and taxes.

    But the worse damage is to our public life and discourse, which had already sunk so low, and to trust in our institutions, which are crucial to our democracy.

     Far Different from the first time: “Trump travel ban takes effect to minimal disruption (Fox News)

    The revised order, which the US Supreme Court approved in part (with some aspects reserved for future decisions), covers 6 countries and does not block foreign individuals with strong personal ties to the US.

    A scaled-down version of President Donald Trump’s travel ban took effect at 8 p.m. ET Thursday, with none of the dramatic scenes of protest and chaos that greeted the original version of Trump’s executive order five months ago.

    The Departments of Homeland Security, State and Justice went ahead with the implementation after the Supreme Court partially restored the order earlier this week. –Fox News

    Comment on Media bias:

    The Fox report was straightforward. Others, not so much.

    It was almost impossible to find a news report that actually gave the news instead of an editorial. The news is that the revised ban went into effect, worked smoothly (so far), and met with only modest demonstrations at airports, far different from the bureaucratic mess and large demonstrations that surrounded the initial order.

    Kudos to the BBC for this neutral headline: “Trump travel ban comes into effect for six countries.”

    Bronx cheer for many others. CNN headline makes no mention of the smooth rollout and modest demonstrations. It does mention further court challenges, even though the main one will come in the autumn at SCOTUS. The challenges are from Democratic state AGs, such as Hawaii, and they mainly ask for clarification. A nothingburger.

    Most of the headlines looked like this. Others emphasized the demonstrations.

     

    Major legal victory: Jury decides US can seize a major Manhattan skyscraper, owned by Iran (New York Times)

    The jury . . . found that the Alavi Foundation, which owns 60 percent of the 36-floor skyscraper at 650 Fifth Avenue, violated United States sanctions against Iran and engaged in money laundering through its partnership with Assa Corporation, a shell company for an Iranian state-controlled bank that had owned the remaining 40 percent. . . .

    The [US] government has agreed to distribute proceeds from the building’s sale, which could bring as much as $1 billion, to the families of victims of Iranian-sponsored terrorist attacks, including the Sept. 11 attacks. –New York Times

    Comment: The same foundation has made donations to Columbia University (link here). The stench runs deep.

    ◆  Washington football team will remain the Redskins. Native American groups and DOJ drop lawsuit after Supreme Court ruling.  (Washington Post)

     Major lawsuit again San Francisco State University over its systematic anti-Semitism, including violent suppression of Jewish speakers, shouted curses, calls for an “intifada,” etc. The suit alleges the university administration was indifferent to repeated complains and actively protected the disrupters.  (Newsweek)

    The lawsuit has been filed by a pro bono organization, the Lawfare Project. The suit

    calls SFSU “among the worst of the worst offenders and is largely recognized as being among the most anti-Semitic campuses in the country.”

    The heckling of Barkat is one of several incidents that the suit argues contributed to an atmosphere hostile to Jewish students, one that was created with the alleged complicity of the school’s administrations. –Newsweek, reporting on Lawfare Project’s suit against SFSU

    Comment: Long overdue. The SFSU administration actually blamed the Israelis for one disruption against them, saying the only reason the mayor of Jerusalem (Nir Barkat) came to speak at SFSU was that he knew the Palestinians and the leftist allies at SFSU would riot to prevent it–and that’s just what Barkat wanted.

    So, this is the logic: the mayor of a large city comes to speak at your university; your students riot and prevent him; you blame the mayor; and then, after promising citizens the rioters would be punished, you do nothing at all.

    Those administrators should be held fully and personally accountable. Their next jobs should be flipping burgers until they are replaced by robots.

    ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦

     

  • ZipDialog Roundup for Tuesday, May 23

    Articles chosen with care. Comments welcomed. Linked articles in bold purple

    ◆ My comment on the vile terror bombing in Manchester is posted separately (here).

    May the innocents rest in peace.

    May the wounded recover fully, in body and mind.

    May the police be safe as they root out the terrorists who prepared and executed this heinous act.

    These prayers have been said far too many times. And we fear this will not be the last time.

     Academic malpractice: Highly-esteemed professor at Duke Divinity School resigns after being attacked for not attending the university’s re-education and training camp for diversity.

    The story is here at The Weekly Standard.

    When Prof. Paul Griffiths refused to attend the “Racial Equity Institute Phase I Training” (it must have been named by Orwell) and explained his reasons, the Dean of the Divinity school attacked with full fury. According to Griffiths, Dean Elaine Heath

    initiates financial and administrative reprisals against Griffiths. Those reprisals ban him from faculty meetings, and, thereby, from voting in faculty affairs; and promise (contra the conditions stated in his letter of appointment) to ban him from future access to research or travel funds. –The Weekly Standard

    The faculty member who runs the re-education and peasant labor camp “launched her own disciplinary proceeding against Griffiths with Duke’s Office of Institutional Equity (OIE).”

    Griffiths’ refusal to attend and his explanation made her workplace “hostile,” naturally. If the PC deans and faculty had their way, Griffiths would be sent to the countryside to plant and harvest rice and learn from the honest peasants.

    The article concludes with a powerful comment by the author, Charlotte Allen:

    It’s hard to figure out what’s more appalling about this episode: the ease with which powerful faculty members can strip their colleagues of their ability to do their jobs just because those colleagues exercise free speech and don’t sign on to their ideological priorities—or the increasing power of bloated university bureaucracies, especially “diversity” bureaucracies over every facet of existence at a university that is supposed to be devoted to the life of the mind. –Charlotte Allen in The Weekly Standard

    Peter Berkowitz, another acute observer of academic follies, has an excellent piece on this Duke fiasco at the Wall Street Journal.

    Comment: Shame on Duke, a school repeatedly cloaked in politically-motivated misdeeds. They seem to learn nothing from their mistakes.

    Bravo to Paul Griffiths, distinguished professor of Catholic theology, who deserves a badge for his intellectual courage. I hope he retains counsel and goes after the malefactors.

     At Dartmouth, somewhat better news

    First the bad news: the university selected as its new dean of the faculty a professor (N. Bruce Duthu) who helped lead his professional association to boycott and sanction all Israeli universities and the professors who work there.

    This sort of thing passes virtually unnoticed among university administrators, who probably missed it when they reviewed Duthu’s qualifications.

    But outside the ivied walls, people did notice it. The university defended him, said he was a swell fellow, and, after some hesitation, he eventually said he had changed his mind about boycotting and sanctioning everything from Israel.

    The good news: after national publicity about his anti-Israel views, Duthu has decided that he shouldn’t take accept the Deanship after all.

    Here’s the story at the Observer.

    Comment: Kudos to Paul Miller and Haym Salomon Center for publicizing Duthu’s role in the BDS (Boycott, Divest, Sanction) movement. Ultimately, what Prof. Duthu did behind closed academic doors couldn’t be justified to a larger audience of Dartmouth faculty, alums, trustees, donors, and others. 

     World’s first operational robot-cop has started work in Dubai. They want them to make up about 1/3 of their police force by 2030. (Daily Mirror, UK)

    Fox News also has a report:

    The Robocop, five feet five inches tall and weighing 220 pounds, speaks six languages and reads facial expressions.

    “He can chat and interact, respond to public queries, shake hands and offer a military salute,” Brigadier-General Khalid Nasser Al Razzouqi, Director-General of Smart Services with the Dubai Police told the Mirror.

    Residents can use the Robocop to pay fines or report crimes, and it also can transmit and receive messages from police headquarters. –Fox News

     Chicago clinches spot as great food city: America’s first Nutella Cafe to open in City of Big Stomachs next week  (Chicago Eater)

     Metaphor alert: Huge sinkhole forms near Trump’s Mar-A-Lago (Forbes)

     The headlines about Betsy DeVos’ speech focused on her promise that “more school choice is coming.” That’s big, if vague.

    But she said something equally important: education should not be run from Washington (USA Today)

    Comment: Exactly right, she, Trump, and the Republicans are beginning to turn around decades of increasing centralization of educational decisionmaking in DC.

    Washington can help by allowing all kinds of experimentation. Let cities and states figure out what works and what fits best in different locales.

    ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦

     

     

  • Dartmouth thinks it’s a good idea to appoint a virulently anti-Israel prof as Dean of the Faculty

    Now, some at Dartmouth are speaking out against promoting Prof. Bruce Duthu to such a prestigious position

    Duthu checks all the right boxes for diversity and inclusion. He comes from one of those “very special” departments, Native American Studies, where there is little critical peer review and leftist ideology rules the roost. It brooks no dissent among students or faculty. To dissent from the approved view is to side with the oppressors, the white supremacists, the colonialists, the capitalists, and so on. It was at such at department (at U Colorado-Boulder) where Ward Churchill spewed his venom until the wider world discovered him and his faux scholarship.

    Departments like Native American studies, Gender Studies, and Black Studies are all firmly on the left–the very far left.

    They uniformly loath Israel, praise the Palestinians, say nothing about terror attacks, and maintain a discreet silence about the vast violations of human rights across the Muslim world. If they need ideological support, the centers for Middle East Studies are always on campus to provide it.

    It is no surprise that Duthu thrived in such a hot-house and did his best to raise the temperature. He

    coauthored a statement in support of the boycott of Israeli academic institutions as follows: “The NAISA Council encourages NAISA members to boycott Israeli academic institutions because they are implicated with the Israeli state and we wish to place pressure on that state to change its policies.”

    –Dartmouth Prof. Alan Gustman, a senior economist, writing publicly to denounce Duthu’s elevation to Dean of the Faculty

    The noxious statement Duthu authored is available online, here (scroll down to the bottom of their web page).

    What Duthu and his association want to do called BDS, or Boycott, Divest, Sanction all Israel institutions, including its universities and their students and faculty. The BDS movement wants sanctions imposed on Israel, wherever possible, and divestment from any investments there. They do not advocate these policies against any other country in the world, as far as I know. Just Israel, which they consider uniquely evil.

    As Prof. Gustman explains:

    In advocating the boycott of Israeli academic institutions, BDS is anti-Semitic. The chant of the BDS movement, from the river to the sea, is anti-Israel, anti-Zionist, and profoundly anti- Jewish. It refers to sweeping the Jews out of Israel. . . .

    This movement has become a cover for many anti-Semites who like nothing better than to once again be free to exercise their prejudices. It also is important to understand, especially when evaluating the significance of appointing a BDS advocate as the Dean of the Faculty, that BDS is not just a statement of beliefs or a philosophical movement: it is a statement of action. –Alan Gustman

    Gustman is not making any accusation about Duthu personally. He says so clearly in his public letter.  What matters is his prominent public advocacy of BDS:

    What is relevant here is that he is supporting a movement that is substantially anti-Semitic, and that he has taken a position with regard to the BDS movement that is in opposition to the position and responsibilities he will have as Dean of the Faculty. Most importantly, he has not publicly renounced his public NAISI statement on the BDS movement. –Alan Gustman

    If this problem were limited to Dartmouth, it might not be worthy of national attention. Alas, it is part of a long-term, international movement by the left and their Palestinian allies to delegitimate and isolate Israel. In their dream world, Israel would be swept away and Palestine would occupy the entire land “from the Jordan River to the (Mediterranean) Sea.”

    And then, as we know from experience across the region, peace, love, friendship, human rights, and religious toleration would take root and cover the land.

    ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦

    You can read more about the Duthu case at

    On a personal note . . . the outgoing Dean of the Faculty, Michael Mastanduno, is a truly outstanding scholar and a model of intellectual probity. I know him and hold him in the highest regard.

    ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦

    Thanks to Richard Baehr, Paul Miller, and Haym Salomon Center for letting me know about his Dartmouth case.

     

  • ZipDialog Roundup for Friday, April 28

    Topics and articles chosen with care. Linked articles in bold purple

     Trump Warns That ‘Major, Major Conflict’ With North Korea Is Possible  (New York Times) The interview was with Reuters and everyone is reporting the same lede.

    Comment: The policy is to make the US threat credible, including the real possibility of war, since that is the only way to get China to move away from their long-standing policy of unflinching support for the Kim Family Enterprise. China has not been happy with young Kim, but they have feared a regime collapse even more. Now, they realize that an even worse outcome–war–could happen if they don’t use leverage.

    Trump has been very careful to say the right things about Beijing and hasn’t gratuitously insulted Kim. Plus, there are steady hands on the security side, even though it would be much better if the State Dept. had its top Asia appointments in place. 

     Government Shutdown? Ryan makes that less likely by postponing healthcare vote until the shutdown issue is resolved (Washington Post)

     South Carolina acts against campus anti-Semitism, despite opposition by pro-Palestinian groups  (The State, SC) The state House bill

    which requires S.C. colleges to use a U.S. State Department definition of anti-Semitism when investigating alleged civil rights violations on campus, was OK’d Thursday by a Senate panel. –The State (South Carolina)

    The governor has said he will sign it into law.

    Comment: EVERY campus has well-organized, single-minded, virulently anti-Israel groups. They sprang up simultaneously on all campuses a few years ago and troll every pro-Israel event. 

     Eliz. Warren “troubled” by Obama’s $400k fee from Wall Street firm for one-hour speech (ABC News)

    Irony alert: She said so in a radio talk promoting her book.

     Amazon, Google release great corporate results, buoy markets Reuters report on Amazon here. Their report on Alphabet (Google) here.

     Trump orders Sec. of Ed. Betsy DeVos to end federal government’s “top-down mandates” and restore local control of schools (USA Today) Devos’ top adviser, Rob Goad, explain the logic

    Since our founding, education was intended to be under state and local control. In recent years, however, too many in Washington have advanced top-down mandates that take away autonomy and limit the options available to educators, administrators, and parents. –USA Today

    According to Goad, Trump’s Executive Order gives the Dept. of Education the power “to modify anything that is inconsistent with federal law.”

    Comment: Good idea, but this is just posing–so far. The Sec. of Education already has the power to “modify anything that is inconsistent with federal law.”

     

    ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦

    zd-hat-tip-facing-inward-100px-w-margin♥ Hat Tip for helpful suggestions:
    ◆ Robert May
    for the South Carolina bill on anti-Semitism

     

  • Students at top London graduate school want most Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, and more dropped from the Syllabus

    Go ahead, guess why.

    You are correct. They are white.

    The school is SOAS, a part of the University of London.

    It used to be called “The School of Oriental and African Studies” until “oriental” became unfashionable after Edward Said’s writings.

    SOAS: A Sinkhole of Anti-Western Vitriol

    For years, SOAS has been a hotbed of left-wing ideology among students and faculty. Over time, that has become less and less tolerant of opposing views.

    One of SOAS’ prominent features is its vitriolic hatred of Israel. To say hatred of Israel there is particularly strong at SOAS is saying something important since hatred of Israel is a common feature of all British universities and nearly all its intellectuals. (That is true in continental Europe, as well.)

    In 2015, three-quarters of SOAS students voted to “Boycott, Divest, and Sanction” Israeli academics, universities, products, corporations, and more. It was a “landslide victory,” as the anti-Israel blog, Electronic Intifada, proudly proclaimed. The blog also noted the “festive atmosphere” that greeted the BDS victory on campus. (The EI blog post is here.)

    Almost all Israelis and supporters of Israel consider the BDS movement to be not only anti-Zionist but also anti-Semitic.

    Now, this pervasive anti-Western ideology has reached its logical conclusion, a reductio ad absurdum.

    Let’s Not Read Authors from the “Wrong” Race or Nationality

    As the Daily Mail reports:

    Students at a University of London college are demanding that such seminal figures as Plato, Descartes, Immanuel Kant and Bertrand Russell should be largely dropped from the curriculum simply because they are white.

    These may be the names that underpin civilisation, yet the student union at the world-renowned School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS) is insisting that when studying philosophy ‘the majority of philosophers on our courses’ should be from Africa and Asia. –Daily Mail

    Granted, these authors might help SOAS students think deeply and rigorously about fundamental topics. Granted, these authors have posed intellectual challenges to serious thinkers for decades–or centuries, even millennia.

    Alas, the students do not grant these points. Their goal is not to confront intellectual challenges.

    The students are absolutely right to want some thinkers from Africa, Asia, the Middle East, and North Africa on their philosophy syllabi if those thinkers are pertinent to the class topic and are the best writers on that topic.

    But the students are absolutely wrong to want to replace great thinkers with anything less for “intellectual affirmative action” reasons.

    If only

    • Plato and Aristotle knew something about citizenship and constitutions, or
    • Hobbes knew something about anarchy, or
    • Locke knew something about rebellion and governmental legitimacy, or
    • Machiavelli knew something about the dark arts of ruling, or
    • Mills knew something about free speech, or
    • Rawls knew something about fairness and equality. . .

    if, perchance, they had insights into these issues, then they might contribute something to these clueless and arrogant students.

     

    In this case–and in many others at SOAS–the students are as contemptible as they are contemptuous.

     

  • ZipDialog’s Roundup of News Beyond the Front Page . . Monday, Dec. 19

    Hand-picked and farm-fresh–
    Linked articles in bold purple

    ◆ Home construction has lagged the rest of the US recovery. (Wall Street Journal)

    ◆ Before the Kardashians, there was Zsa Zsa Gabor. The same idea: bling, glamor, strange voice, no talent except for publicity. Now Zsa Zsa is dead dead.  She was 99. (LA Times)

    ◆ It is with great personal pleasure I announce the following: my spellcheck does not recognize the word “Kardashian.”

    ◆ Most reports about Trump’s nominee to be US ambassador to Israel have been critical, emphasizing his conservative views and lack of foreign policy experience. Elliott Abrams has a far more positive view of the nominee, David Friedman. (Abrams’ blog at the Council on Foreign Relations)

    ◆ Well, that was a bad idea, Attorney General Loretta Lynch says of her meeting with Bill Clinton. Jake Tapper of CNN does a fine job bringing out her views. (CNN)

    ◆ For years, Middle East Studies departments in US universities have been cesspools of hatred for Israel and for anyone (Jewish, Evangelical, or other) who supports Israel. They have received no pushback from university administrators or faculty. The federal government has funded them for language training, even though the departments’ hatred of the US government is strong and deep. Now, Middle East Studies Departments across the country are lashing out at the prospect of a Trump presidency, using the language of victimization they have taught students for years, writes Cinnamon Stillwell and Michael Lumish at Campus Watch.

    ◆ GQ has an article entitled “Mitch McConnell is the Real Evil One.” The subtitle is equally subtle, “Where Do You Think Trump Learned to Gaslight America?”

    I am not being hyperbolic when I say that Mitch McConnell is evil. The coming Trump Presidency is already an assembly line of shitty, apocalyptic consequences getting cranked out 24/7, and the fact that McConnell now holds near-total power over Congress is perhaps the most unbearable side effect of them all. –Drew Magary in GQ

    Comment: When I need political analysis, I go to GQ for fashion advice.

    ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦

     

  • US-Israel Academic Collaboration Rises Dramatically

    ◆ Israel is most visible on college campuses when it is being blackballed. But there is quiet pushback from serious scholars.

    The anti-Israel movement is known at “BDS,” which stands for “Boycott, Divest, and Sanction” Israel.

    It means boycotting not only Israeli products, but severing cooperation with Israeli universities and the faculty who teach there. The goal is to delegitimate the Jewish state, and it is pushed non-stop by Palestinian students and their allies among activist Muslims and student leftists.

    ◆ Comment: BDS has largely failed. The movement has garnered plenty of attention, but it has failed in its more ambitious goals, at least in the US. (In Europe, the picture is grimmer. Anti-Israeli sentiments and full-blown anti-Semitism have risen to toxic levels, on both left and right.)

    In the US, the BDS movement has gained some traction among left-wing students and faculty in the humanities and some social sciences, as well as Muslim activists. These groups constantly harrass pro-Israel students, demonstrating whenever there is an “evil Zionist speaker,” a benign Israeli birthday celebration, and so forth. Beyond that, the movement has accomplished little. They embrace defeat and futility as marks of honor. Every spring on college campuses across America, they hold “Israel Apartheid Week” and attempt to build broader opposition to Israel.

    They are not gaining much support beyond the committed left and self-proclaimed Social Justice Vigilantes.

    • No universities or corporations have agreed to boycott investments in Israel.
    • Corporate investments in Israel are very strong, especially in the high-tech areas where Israel is a global leader.
    • Many universities have also increased their collaboration with Israeli counterparts.

    ◆ Beneath the surface, there are also important signs of rising civic and academic cooperation between the US and Israel. A recent report shows a dramatic rise in collaboration between US and Israeli scholars, particularly in biomedicine and the physical sciences. (Times of Israel) The study, led by Dr. Daphne Getz, looked at academic papers with co-authors from both Israel and the US.

    The highest number of joint U.S.-Israel publications are in the field of Medicine, followed by Physics and Astronomy, Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology, Computer Sciences, Mathematics, Engineering, Agriculture and Environmental Sciences, Social Sciences, Material Sciences and Earth and Planetary Sciences. –study by Dr. Daphne Getz of the Samuel Neaman Institute

    There is also extensive cooperation in information technology and cyber-security, fields where Israeli scientists are among the world’s leaders.

    The study also shows a 78% increase in the number of American students attending Israeli universities between 2004 and 2014.

    The leading Israeli research universities are

    • Technion: Israel Institute of Technology
    • Hebrew University of Jerusalem
    • Weizmann Institute of Science
    • Tel Aviv University
    • Bar-Ilan University
    • University of Haifa

    Comment: The rising numbers of research collaborations and international co-authorships reflect the strength of Israeli academic institutions and much lower costs of communicating among co-authors around the world. They also show that street demonstrations by aggressive anti-Israel activists mask a rising connection among serious scholars.

    ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦

    zd-hat-tip-facing-inward-100px-w-margin♥ Hat Tip for helpful suggestions:
    ◆ Ron Hassner
     for the news item

    detective-cartoon-see-something-say-something-no-caption-201px

    ◆ Send interesting stories to
    Charles (dot) Lipson at Gmail (dot) com

     

  • ZipDialog’s Roundup of News Beyond the Front Page . . Tuesday, Nov. 22


    Hand-picked and farm-fresh–

    Linked articles in bold purple

    putin-on-horse Putin moves nuclear missiles closer to Europe as a strong statement against NATO and its defense of Baltic states (Telegraph)

    ◆ Palestinian activists in the US and Europe try to delegitimate Israel with “Boycott, Divest, and Sanction” tactics.

    anti-semitism-on-campus-140px-margins-on-all-sidesThey have many tactics to attack the Jewish state, but one of their most important is to “Boycott all Israeli products, Divest from all investments in Israel or Israeli-companies (or sometimes all companies that do business in Israel), and Sanction Israel, Israeli institutions (such as universities), and sometimes ordinary Israeli citizens.”

    Boycott, Divest, and Sanction–BDS–is popular with the left on college campuses.  Miriam Elman, a professor at Syracuse University, clearly explains what BDS is and why it is despicable. Well worth reading. (Syracuse.com and the Post Standard)

    kim-jung-un-on-flag-300px-square-no-margins◆ China, eager to protect its North Korean ally, blocks internet searches for “Fatty Kim the Third”  (ABC17News)

    ◆ Hampshire College bans the American flag: it’s just too controversial.

    Students at the western Massachusetts school took down the flag on Veterans Day and burned it, protesting the election of Donald Trump.

    So Hampshire did what any institution of higher learning would do: they replaced the flag and immediately announced it would be flown at half-staff,

    both to acknowledge the grief and pain experienced by so many and to enable the full complexity of voices and experiences to be heard –Hampshire College, announcing US flag would be flown at half-staff after Trump election

    Not good enough for students at the western Massachusetts college. And, oddly enough, some military families thought it might be disrespectful.

    So, once again, Hampshire acted decisively. They have now removed all US flags from campus since, as the college president noted, people have a “range of views” about the nation’s symbol. The Washington Post story is here.hampshirecollegelogo

    ◆ Meanwhile, students at Oxford University have appointed an official to protect its students from microaggressions. (Heat Street)

    doj-dept-of-justice-logo-clear-200px◆ The Department of Justice has fined the city of Denver $10,000 for hiring only US citizens as police officers. DOJ says the citizenship requirement is unlawful. (Daily Caller)

    ◆ And a great picture, thanks to Robin Steward, who claims “it’s not mine!”regret-nothing-tatoo

    ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦

    zd-hat-tip-facing-inward-100px-w-margin♥ Hat Tip for helpful suggestions:
    ◆ Timothy Favero
     for the Hampshire College story
    ◆ Miriam Elman for her article on the Boycott, Divest, Sanctions (BDS) movement
    ◆ Robin Steward for the tattoo picture

  • ZipDialog’s Roundup of News Beyond the Front Page . . Friday, Nov. 18

    Hand-picked and farm-fresh–
    Linked articles in bold purple


    mike-flynn-labeled-300px-no-margins◆ Retired 3-star general Michael Flynn will be Trump’s National Security Advisor
    . (Washington Post) He headed the Defense Intelligence Agency under Pres. Obama but left the administration and became a sharp critic.

    ◆ “We’re going to move an agenda,” VP-elect Mike Pence told House Republicans. Working with Congress, the new administration intends to pass a lot of legislation, Pence told the closed-door meeting. (Bloomberg)

    Comment: That’s not an idle promise. It’s not just Trump’s ambitious agenda. It’s Capitol Hill under continuing Republican control. Over the last few years, the Republicans have passed lots of bills that died on Pres. Obama’s desk. The same leaders are in place in the House and Senate. They know these issues, have already written bills on the big issues, and will be ready to push legislation early in 2017.

    trump-pence-mcconnell-ryan-300px-no-margins

    ◆ “An Anti-Israel Brigade with Ties to Hamas Finds a Home in San Francisco State University,” writes Cinnamon Stillwell (Independent Journal Review) Oppose the people doing this at SFSU, and guess what they call you? That’s right, you would be an Islamophobe, McCarthyist, hatemonger and–worst of all–a Zionist. The deal is an official tie between SFSU and a Hamas-dominated university, An-Najah University, located in the West Bank.

    ⇒ Related story: Palestinian group is demanding that Kent State University remove an incredibly offensive object: a picture of the late Israeli leader, Golda Meir. The simple photograph hurts their feelings because, well, you can guess. (Abraham Miller in The Observer)

    ◆ One of the makers of the modern world, Jay Forrester, has died at 98. Forrester, an MIT professor raised on a Nebraska cattle ranch, developed the field of computer modeling complex systems. He is also one of the men who invented magnetic core memory for computers. His obituary is here. (New York Times)

    ◆ The Washington Post thinks this is newsworthy: “Trump terrifies me. Should I rent my house to his supporters for the inauguration?” by Cari Shane. It perfectly captures the Post’s view and the Beltway Zeitgeist.

    kris-bryant-labeled◆ Go, Cubs, Go. Their second-year star, Kris Bryant, is the nearly unanimous choice as National League MVP. (Chicago Tribune)

    ◆ Chicago’s Skyline To Be Sold as Lego Set. The set will be smaller than the original, according to the Chicago Tribune.

    ◆ I love it: A startup says it has created a robot that cuts grass and shovels show. (CNN)

     

    ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦